SSTDC Overview

BACKGROUND

The collegiate Student Safety Technology Design Competition (SSTDC) is hosted by the International Technical Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles (ESV) the only government-sponsored vehicle safety conference that brings together leading engineering experts from governments, automobile manufacturers, suppliers, safety researchers and other motor vehicle safety professionals. Conceived in 2004 at the 19th ESV Conference in Washington, D.C., the competition began as a way of getting more students involved in vehicle safety. It was an instant success, and the program has grown over the years addressing emerging vehicle safety priorities worldwide, such as distraction mitigation and autonomous vehicle issues.

MISSION

The mission of the SSTDC is to foster personal growth, leadership, and opportunities in vehicle safety research technology, innovation, design, and engineering. Students have the opportunity to apply and integrate science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) concepts as they compete for one first place team winner and one runner-up team. Recognition as an award winner at the ESV Conference is a great achievement and honor.

HOW THE COMPETITION WORKS

Teams consisting of university-level seniors and/or graduate students, guided by one faculty advisor, submit a written abstract related to a global vehicle safety research priority. Entries are judged in each of the three geographic regions, with six teams selected to participate in their regional competition. A panel of safety experts visits each team's school, evaluates the designs, and selects three finalist teams per region. Participating teams must be from ESV member countries.

The three finalist teams from each region compete for top honors at the 26th ESV Conference in Eindhoven, Netherlands on June 10-13, 2019, where their prototype devices will be on display in the exhibition hall. An international panel of judges, made up of vehicle safety engineering experts from around the world, will select one first-place team winner and one runner-up team, both of whom will receive an award and international recognition for their achievements.

WHY STUDENTS SHOULD PARTICIPATE IN THE SSTDC

The SSTDC gives young scholars from Asia-Pacific, Europe, and North America an exciting opportunity to design, build, and demonstrate a cost- effective conceptual scale model of a vehicle safety technology. This competition is not only a great opportunity for collegiate students to compete in, but an achievement in a student's academic journey - one they can be proud of long after the conference is over. Students are also presented with an opportunity to network with fellow students and industry experts from around the world during four days of informative presentations and rich program content during the 26th ESV Conference.

CALL FOR SSTDC ABSTRACTS

The call for abstracts will open on July 2, 2018. We encourage your participation in the 8th Bi-Annual Student Safety Technology Design Competition and look forward to receiving your abstract.

SSTDC Key Dates

Key Dates Graphic
  • November 9, 2018 Entry Submission (Abstract) Deadline
  • November 21, 2018 Notification of Selected Regional Teams
  • March 6 to March 17 2019 Regional Design Evaluation
  • March 21, 2019 Notification of International Finalists
  • June 12, 2019 Oral Presentation by International Finalists
  • June 12, 2019 First-place winner and runner-up selection and recognition

SSTDC FLOWCHART

Upon approval of abstract submissions, teams are selected to develop a conceptual and functional model, and prepare a report. Reports are then evaluated, and finalist teams are selected to deliver an oral presentation at the 26th ESV Conference in The Netherlands.

SSTDC Flowchart graphic of Key dates

SSTDC: 26TH ESV CONFERENCE WEEK STUDENT SCHEDULE

Eligibility and Guidelines

The Student Safety Technology Design Competition (SSTDC) is open to all teams consisting of university- level seniors and/or graduate students, guided by one faculty advisor within our ESV member countries.

General Guidelines for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles (ESV) SSTDC

  • Identify an important safety problem and develop the concept for an original vehicle-based technology to address this safety problem
  • Create a functional scale or life-size model of this vehicle-based technology
  • Document the development of the functional scale or life-size model by presenting the results via a report and regional demonstration. Teams selected to participate in the final international judging will present their work orally and discuss the potential safety impact of the technology to the judges. They will also exhibit their safety inventions and devices during the ESV Conference in The Netherlands, in a special booth set up for this purpose
  • Give a 15-minute technical presentation at a special conference session. The presentation will include a discussion of the safety problem being addressed, description of the countermeasures envisioned, and potential safety benefits

Entry Requirements

Each team must meet these requirements to participate in the competition. All entries* must be written in English and:

  • Outline a vehicle safety problem
  • Contain a title, competition category, and a 300-word (maximum) abstract

Abstract Requirements

Each team must also meet these requirements to participate in the competition. All abstracts must be written in English and

  • Clearly identify the device or system that the team will build to address the safety problem outlined.
  • Explain briefly how adoption of such a device or system could reduce the number of crashes, mitigate injuries, and/or prevent fatalities and injuries if deployed in vehicles and put into real-world operation in the fleet.
  • Be submitted via e-mail to SSTDC@dot.gov no later than November 9, 2018.

*Only one entry per team: Multiple entries under different competition categories from the same team will not be accepted. Upon receipt of each team's entry, the team lead will notify their faculty advisor.

Financial Assistance & Corp. Sponsorship

Based on the competition criteria, a maximum of six teams will be invited to participate in their regional competitions.

Each team selected to compete in the North American regional competition from the United States will be awarded up to US$2,000 from NHTSA to help offset the costs involved in its design efforts.

Each team selected to compete in the European and Asia-Pacific regional competition should contact their regional coordinators to determine if financial assistance is available. If available, this assistance should not exceed the equivalent of US$2,000/team.

All teams are encouraged to seek corporate sponsors. Corporate sponsorship, to include funds to offset the costs of the design efforts is limited to the equivalent of US$3,000 per team (limited to US$1,000 for North American teams). All teams are limited to the equivalent of US$5,000 (US$3,000 for design effort, US$2,000 for travel) but corporate sponsorship is not a requirement. Total project costs must not exceed the equivalent of US$5,000 funding ceiling that includes any contributions from sponsors. The international finalist teams are permitted to seek additional funding beyond the US$3,000 limit to offset travel costs to and from the conference. European and Asia-Pacific teams can seek travel support from their regional competition.

Conference registration fees will be waived for a maximum of two team members from each of the nine international finalists.

Vehicle Safety Categories

With 15 competition categories to select from, students have a broad range of technical topics that span current vehicle safety priorities throughout the world. Each student design must address a real-world vehicle safety problem from one of the following competition categories:

1. Electric Vehicle Safety

New system concepts that address safety issues in electric vehicles-for example: preventing and detecting thermal runaway in lithium ion batteries; communicating safety information unique to electric vehicles, etc.

2. Autonomous Vehicle Issues

New concepts that can address safety issues associated with the introduction of advanced vehicle automation systems and autonomous vehicle concepts-for example: driver interface concepts to maintain situational awareness, automated means to assess/anticipate traffic conditions and risk, strategies for the engagement/disengagement of automation, automated detection and management of conditions that require driver decision, e.g. 4 way stop, highway ingress/egress, traffic flow and inter-driver cuing.

3. Vehicle Electronics Reliability

New concepts to assure the safe operation of motor vehicles due to increasing complexity of automotive safety-critical electronic control innovations-for example: novel approaches to system software test and validation; diagnostics and prognostics for intelligent vehicle health management; fail-safe and fail-operational mechanisms, etc.

4. Cybersecurity

New approaches to address safety issues associated with cyber-attacks and electronic system vulnerabilities-for example: hardening motor vehicles against potential cybersecurity threats, detection and prevention of unauthorized access or malicious attacks; capturing data from unauthorized access or malicious attacks to enable forensic examination; and alerting the driver to vehicle limitations due to attacks.

5. Cell Phone Distraction Prevention Technologies

New system concepts that can help prevent cell phone-related distractions while driving-for example: novel in-vehicle systems that can detect cell phone use and provide a countermeasure.

6. Crash Avoidance Technologies

Driver assistance in critical situations-for example: new concepts for crash warning systems, crash mitigation systems, crash prevention systems or new sensors which could provide inputs to such warning/mitigation or prevention systems.

7. Restraint System Enhancement

Systems minimizing injuries to vehicle occupants during a crash-for example: vehicle interior design enhancements to seatbelts, airbags, and head restraints; integration of pre-crash sensors to optimize restraint performance, occupant position sensors, etc.

8. Post-Crash Safety

Vehicle and triage enhancements that improve post-crash injury prevention and treatment-for example: automated crash notification, crash severity prediction, minimizing fuel leakage, fire mitigation, advanced bystander care, automated crash scene measurement and reporting etc.

9. Impaired Driving Countermeasures

Systems to reduce impaired driving-for example: ignition interlocks, passive drug, alcohol sensors, etc.

10. Crash Compatibility

Improved protection for occupants in vehicle-to-vehicle collisions-for example: by use of new energy-absorbing structures, improving geometric alignment; by optimizing the energy absorption during crash, etc. Intrusion caused by over-ride and under-ride could be improved-for example: adaptive and active bumper heights, composite research, ultra-light steel, etc.

11. Distraction Mitigation

New technologies to lessen driver distraction and minimize workload-for example: methods to detect distracted drivers, interfaces to influence drivers distracting behaviors; methods to adjust displays based on workload, etc.

12. Vision Systems

Innovative vision systems to improve visibility and conspicuity to detect other vehicles, people, objects and other hazards in the traffic environment, etc.

13. Dummy Design and Instrumentation

New system concepts that address safety issues in electric vehicles-for example: preventing and detecting thermal runaway in lithium ion batteries; communicating safety information unique to electric vehicles, etc.

14. Pedestrian Crash Avoidance or Injury Mitigation

Technologies to sense pedestrians or pedal cyclists in the vehicle's travel path may reduce the risk of a pedestrian-to-vehicle crash. Also, redesign of passenger vehicle structures or deployable devices to minimize pedestrian/pedal cyclist's injuries are sought to comply with newly approved international regulations.

15. Test Devices and Test and Evaluation Procedures

Innovative full system test and evaluation procedures by which effectiveness of safety countermeasures and full system benefits could be assessed.

Scoring Criteria and Awards

Scoring Criteria for Abstract Submissions

  • Potential impact on safety problem being addressed (30 points)
  • Originality (25 points)
  • Practicability of creating a functional scale model (25 points)
  • Supporting details, quality, technical depth (20 points)
Total points: 100

Scoring Criteria for Regional and International Competition

Judging of each team's project, including their functional models and reports, will take place at each team's respective college or university in March 2019. Team reports must be submitted in English and no more than 3,000 words (approximately six pages) in length.

Judges will view a presentation of the functional models and review the written reports.* The following criteria for both the regional and final competitions will be considered, and judges will award points based on:

Potential impact on safety problem being addressed (40 points)
  • Did the team address a safety problem?
  • How did the team test and evaluate its system?
  • What metrics did the team use?
  • What are the results of the testing?
  • Are conclusions presented clearly?
  • What potential or expected effects will the system have on traffic safety?
Originality (20 points)
Functional scale model, physical presentation (20 points)
Oral presentation (10 points)
Supporting details, quality, thoroughness, technical depth (10 points)

Total points: 100

*Students are encouraged to include the following in their report:

  • Estimated safety benefits in terms of lives saved or crashes prevented
  • The percentage of the passenger fleet covered and the percentage of the problem countermeasures

Awards

Winning teams will be presented with a plaque by representatives from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), U.S. Department of Transportation and the 26th ESV Conference Organizing Committee in The Netherlands

  • First Place: 1st Place Award plaque and recognition at the 26th ESV Conference, in the final program and on NHTSA's ESV Web site.
  • Runner-up: Runner-up Award plaque and recognition at the 26th ESV Conference, in the final program and on NHTSA's ESV Web site.

Regions and Coordinators

There are three competition regions based on the ESV member countries participation: Asia Pacific (including Japan, Korea, and Australia), Europe, and North America (including Canada and the United States). The list of the Regional Coordinators and their addresses are given below:


ASIA PACIFIC

Masashi Yukawa
Manager, Global Development / Exposition
Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan, Inc.
10-2 Gobancho, Chiyoda-ku,
Tokyo 102-0076, Japan
E-mail: sstdc@jsae.or.jp

Younghan Youn
Korea University of Technology and Education
Engineering Professor
307 Gajun-ri, Byungchum-myun, Cheonan, Chungnam, Korea 330-807
Phone + 82 415-601-136 Fax +82 415-601-360
Email: yhyoun@koreatech.ac.kr


EUROPE

Bernd Lorenz
Head of Section F2 - Passive Vehicle Safety, Biomechanics
Federal Highway Research Institute (BASt)
Bruederstraße 53, D-51427 Bergisch Gladbach
Phone +49 2204 43-5200, Fax +49 2204 43-5250
Email: lorenz@bast.de


NORTH AMERICA

Art Carter
Coordinator for the United States, NHTSA
ESV Student Competition Organizer
1200 New Jersey Ave. SE
Washington, DC 20590 USA
Phone: 202-366-5669
Email: Arthur.Carter@dot.gov

SSTDC Format

The 8th Bi-Annual Student Safety Technology Design Competition now showcases the extraordinary talents of college students from ESV member countries.

The competition is organized as a three-tiered approach:

  • Written abstract submission: On November 9, 2018, abstract submissions will close, and the competition coordinators will each select a panel of three judges by November 14, 2018, to review the team entries from each of the respective regions or countries.
  • Regional competition: On November 21, 2018, teams selected to participate in the regional design evaluation will be notified. From March 6-17, 2019, a panel of judges will visit the selected teams’ universities to evaluate the developed safety concept and functional design model and select finalist teams. The panel of judges may consist of both the government and industry automotive safety experts who will select the finalists from their respective regions.
  • International competition: On June 12, 2018, the finalist teams will be required to give a 15-minute oral PowerPoint presentation during a special technical session for students at the 26th ESV Conference in The Netherlands. Each team’s presentation should be a stand-alone detailed description that clearly shows the team’s knowledge of the subject, and should give the judges a positive overall impression. During the exhibition, the international panel of judges will evaluate each team’s prototype. Each team will have a maximum of ten minutes to present and demonstrate the functional model. The same criterion that was used to judge the regional competition will be used to judge the international competition.

The final competitors at the ESV Conference in The Netherlands will consist of the winners from each regional jurisdiction, not to exceed three teams per region. In Netherlands, an international panel of judges will select a first-place winner team and a runner-up team, both of whom will receive an award and international recognition for their achievements. The international panel will consist of judges from each geographical region (Asia-Pacific, Europe, and North America).

Previous Winners

25th ESV 2017 Winners

24th ESV 2015 Winners

23rd ESV 2013 Winners

California Polytechnic State University

REGION 3 | NORTH AMERICA

1st Place
Competition Category: Crash Avoidance Technologies
Team Name: California Polytechnic State University
Team Members: Ian Painter, Thomas Stevens, Elliot Carlson
Advisor: Dr. Charles Birdsong
Project Title: Automatic Crash Avoidance Sensor Development and Scale Vehicle Demonstration
Seoul National University, Korea

REGION 1 | ASIA-PACIFIC

2nd Place
Competition Category: Autonomous Vehicle Issues and Crash Avoidance Technologies
Team Name: Seoul National University, Korea
Team Members: Taeyoung Lee, Dongwook Kim, Beomjun Kim, Dongwoo Park, Jihwan Yoon, Seungjae Han
Advisor: Kyongsu Yi
Project Title: Development of a Smart Co-Driver System

22nd ESV 2011 Winners

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM Madrid, Spain)

REGION 3 | Europe

1st Place
Competition Category:
Team Name: Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM Madrid, Spain)
Team Members:
Advisor:
Project Title: Child Restraint System with Pre-Tensionera and Load Limiter Functionality
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VT) – Wake Forest University (WFU) Center for Injury Biomechanics

REGION 1 | NORTH AMERICA

2nd Place
Competition Category:
Team Name: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VT) – Wake Forest University (WFU) Center for Injury Biomechanics
Team Members:
Advisor:
Project Title: Deflection Measurement System fort the Hybrid III Six-Year Old Biofidelic Abdomen

21st ESV 2009 Winners

Institute of Automotive Engineering RWTH, Aachen University, Germany

REGION 3 | Europe

1st Place
Competition Category:
Team Name: Institute of Automotive Engineering RWTH, Aachen University, Germany
Team Members: Jens Bovenkerk, Fabian Schmitt, Nikhil Kotris
Advisor: Prof. Stefan Gies
Project Title: New Testing Method For Deployable Pedestrian Protection Systems
Technical University Munich, Germany

REGION 1 | Europe

2nd Place
Competition Category:
Team Name: Technical University Munich, Germany
Team Members: Daniel Schwarz, Christian Morhart
Advisor: Prof. Dr. Erwin Biebl
Project Title: Emergency Braking System For Pedestrian Protection Using Cooperative Sensor Technology

20th ESV 2007 Winners

Institute of Automotive Engineering RWTH, Aachen University, Germany

REGION 3 | NORTH AMERICA

1st Place
Competition Category: Dummy Design and Instrumentation
Team Name: Institute of Automotive Engineering RWTH, Aachen University, Germany
Team Members: Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Advisor:
Project Title: A Biofidelic Lung Surrogate for Anthropomorphic Test Devices to Predict Pulmonary Contusion Following Motor Vehicle Crash
Fachhochschule Trier

REGION 1 | Europe

2nd Place
Competition Category: Test Devices and Test and Evaluation Procedures
Team Name: Fachhochschule Trier
Team Members:
Advisor:
Project Title: System to Measure and Evaluate the Seat Belt Usage Rate in Coaches

19th ESV 2005 Winners

University of Valladolid

REGION 3 | Europe

1st Place
Competition Category:
Team Name: University of Valladolid
Team Members:
Advisor:
Project Title: Lateral Safety For Children
University of Virginia

REGION 1 | NORTH AMERICA

2nd Place
Competition Category:
Team Name: University of Virginia
Team Members:
Advisor:
Project Title: A System for Reducing Pediatric Restraint Injuries


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